bryan coe digital marketing strategist

Google Search Console Finally Gets Historical Data!

Everyone that has a Google Search Console account should have recently received a notification “Introducing the new Search Console (beta).”  And if you’re an SEO or a marketing agency you probably been suffering from an onslaught of emails notifying you of this. Google REALLY wants everyone to know about the updated UI and functionality.

But with that minor annoyance aside. It’s like Christmas for SEOs! FINALLY we can now see historical data in GSC, up to 16 months. This means we will be able to finally do year over year comparisons. WOOHOO!! Older than that you won’t be able to see in the tool so you may still need to do some exporting and backups, but this is so much better than the previous 90 days.

To do this:

  1. log into Google Search Console and go to the property you want to look at.
  2. If you end up in the old version. Go to notifications. There you should see the notification about the new GSC and you can click on the link to the new version.
  3. Then go to “Performance”
  4. At the top you’ll see the standard filter for “Last 3 months”
  5. Click the edit pencil
  6. Then choose “Full Duration” to get the last 16 months.

Your report should then look something like the one below.

Google Search Console full duration report

Google’s Year in Search 2017

How did you search this year?  View the trending list for 2017.

 

Google’s New Mobile-Friendly Update Does Not Affect AdWords

google adwords logoYou may have heard the news from Google that they have updated their algorithm to include mobile-friendliness as a ranking signal. The update, which went into effect on April 21, 2015, will only affect organic search, NOT paid search/AdWords.  In fact mobile-friendliness has been part of the AdWords quality score since 2011.

This was confirmed by Kate O’Donovan from the Google AdWords team in Dublin. She posted the announcement in the Google AdWords Help forum:

Starting Today, April 21 2015, we will be expanding our use of mobile-friendliness as a ranking signal. This change will affect mobile searches in all languages worldwide and will have a significant impact in our search results.

 While this change will not impact your advertising campaigns, mobile friendliness has been an ads quality factor since November 2011

She also ended her post by stating it even more clearly:

Remember this update will not affect your AdWords performance or your individual Quality Scores.

What’s the take away from this? Well, if you haven’t updated your site to be mobile friendly and you’re running paid search ad campaigns with AdWords, you’re probably already taking a hit on your quality score for mobile ads. You can overcome this, but generally if you want to overcome poor quality scores, you will end up paying more for your clicks. But the most recent update to Google’s Algorithm will not change this.

Want to check if your pages are mobile-friendly? Google gives us a great tool for this: Google’s Mobile Friendly Test Tool. They’ve also created a guide to help you get your site mobile-friendly: Google Mobile Guide